Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for Study Plan for ... Plan... · FY20 Section 319(h) Projects Study Plan July 2020 . 1 . Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for Study Plan - [PDF Document] (2024)

  • FY20 Section 319(h) Projects Study Plan July 2020

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    Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for Study Plan for CWASection 319(h) Projects –

    Pre-Implementation Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2020 Projects

    Division of Surface Water

    Ecological Assessment Unit

    Assessment and Modeling Section

  • FY20 Section 319(h) Projects Study Plan July 2020

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    Quality Assurance Project Plan for Study Plan for

    CWA Section 319(h) Projects –

    Pre-Implementation Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2020 Projects

    August 3, 2020

    Prepared by

    State of Ohio Environmental Protection Agency

    Ecological Assessment Unit

    Assessment and Modeling Section

    4675 Homer Ohio Lane

    Groveport, Ohio 43125

    Division of Surface Water

    Lazarus Government Center

    50 West Town Street, Suite 700

    Mike Dewine, Governor Laurie A. Stevenson, Director

    State of Ohio Ohio Environmental Protection Agency

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    Section A – Project Management

    A1 – Quality Assurance Project Plan for CWA Section 319(h)Projects: Pre-Implementation Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2020Projects Projects Sign-Off

    Date:

    Brian Hall, Assistant Chief

    Date:

    Mari Piekutowski, Assessment and Modeling Manager

    Date:

    John Mathews, Nonpoint Source Program Manager

    Date:

    Ben Rich, Ecological Assessment Unit Supervisor

    Date:

    Melanie Rudolf, Wetland Ecologist

    Date:

    Ben Foster, Macroinvertebrate Biologist

    Date:

    Elizabeth Hagen, Quality Assurance Officer

    Date:

    Andrew Phillips, Fish Biologist and Study Team Leader

    10/15/2020

    10/19/2020

    10/19/2020

    10/19/2020

    10/19/20

    10/20/2020

    12/1/2020

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    A2 – Table of Contents

    Section A – Project Management.................................................................................................................3

    A1 – Quality Assurance Project Plan for CWA Section 319(h)Projects: Pre-Implementation Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2020Projects ProjectsSign-Off..................................................................3

    A2 – Table of Contents.............................................................................................................................4

    A3 – Distribution List..............................................................................................................................6

    A4 – Project/Task Organization and Communication...........................................................................6

    A4.1 Roles and Responsibilities...........................................................................................................6

    A5 – Problem Definition/Background.....................................................................................................7

    A6 – Project Task/Description.................................................................................................................7

    A6.1 – Project Descriptions.....................................................................................................................7

    A7 – Quality Objectives and Criteria...................................................................................................39

    A8 – Special Training/Certification......................................................................................................39

    A9 – Documents and Records................................................................................................................39

    A9.1 Document/Record Control.........................................................................................................39

    A9.2 DocumentStorage......................................................................................................................40

    Section B – Data Generation and Acquisition.............................................................................................40

    B1 – Sampling Process Design..............................................................................................................40

    B2 – Sampling Methods.........................................................................................................................40

    B3 – Sample Handling and Custody.....................................................................................................41

    B4 – Analytical Methods.......................................................................................................................41

    B5 – Quality Control..............................................................................................................................41

    B6 – Instrument/Equipment Testing, Inspection, and Maintenance................................................. 42

    B7 - Instrument/Equipment Calibration and Frequency....................................................................42

    B8 – Inspection/Acceptance of Supplies and Consumables.................................................................42

    B9 – Non-Direct Measurements............................................................................................................42

    B10 – Data Management.......................................................................................................................42

    B10.1 – EA3........................................................................................................................................42

    B10.2 - YSI® Pro Series Units...........................................................................................................43

    B10.3- Fish, VIBI, and QHEI Data Sheets.......................................................................................43

    Section C – Assessment and Oversight.......................................................................................................43

    C1 – Assessments and Response Actions.............................................................................................43

    C1.1 – Assessments............................................................................................................................43

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    C1.2 - Response Actions.....................................................................................................................43

    C1.3 - Reporting and Resolution of Issues........................................................................................44

    C1.4 - Data Completeness..................................................................................................................44

    C2 – Reports to Management................................................................................................................44

    C2.1 – Use Attainment.......................................................................................................................44

    C2.2 – Stream Habitat Evaluation....................................................................................................44

    C2.3 – Wetland Use Attainment, Antidegration Category andFloristic Quality .......................... 45

    SECTION D: DATA VALIDATION AND USABILITY.........................................................................................45

    D1 – Data Review, Verification, and Validation..................................................................................45

    D2 – Verification and Validation Methods...........................................................................................45

    D3 – Reconciliation with User Requirements......................................................................................45

    References..................................................................................................................................................46

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    A3 – Distribution List

    A3.1 – Ohio EPA Central Office Staff Name, Title Email Phone

    Melinda Harris, TMDL Supervisor [emailprotected]614-728-1357

    Andrew Phillips, Fish Biologist and Project Leader, EAU[emailprotected] 614-836-8773

    Marianne Piekutowski, AMS Manager[emailprotected] 614-644-2876

    Vacant, EAU Supervisor - -

    Benjamin Foster, Macroinvertebrate Biologist[emailprotected] 614-644-3061

    Rick Wilson, §319 Program Technical Lead[emailprotected] 614-644-2032

    John Mathews, §319 Program Manager [emailprotected]614-265-6685

    Audrey Rush, STS Manager [emailprotected]614-644-2035

    Melanie Rudolf, Wetland Ecologist [emailprotected]614-644-2026

    Elizabeth Hagen, Quality Assurance Officer[emailprotected] 614-705-1011

    A4 – Project/Task Organization and Communication

    A4.1 Roles and Responsibilities

    Individual(s) Assigned Responsible For: Authorized To:

    Chief or Asst. Chief Allocate resources, project implementation,resolve disputes.

    Resolve disputes, suggest changes and edits, approve neededresources, approve overall project and QAPP

    EAU Supervisor (Vacant) Staff assignment, signatures, payments,and reporting. Confirm intermediate and final milestones completedin a timely manner.

    Review documents and reports; suggest changes and edits; obtainapprovals and signatures.

    Elizabeth Hagen Quality Assurance Coordinator

    QA/QC input to document development. Prepare documents andreports. Follow-up on deliverable delays and their manager for ALUinformation.

    Review documents and reports; suggest changes and edits.

    Rick Wilson Nonpoint Source Program

    Will ensure QAPP revisions & distribution

    Review documents and reports; suggest changes and edits

    John Mathews Manager

    Oversight of planning and resource expenditures, participate indecision making as necessary

    Resolve disputes, suggest changes and edits, approve needed

    mailto:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]

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    Individual(s) Assigned Responsible For: Authorized To:

    resources, approve overall project and QAPP

    Andrew Phillips Fish Biologist Benjamin Foster MacroinvertebrateBiologist

    Scheduling and coordination of field activities. Complete fieldactivities and quality control; field sampling and analysis, datacollection, review, analysis, verification, database population andtransmission. Assist with project planning.

    Prepare documents and reports. Arrange for external training.Schedule field activities.

    Melanie Rudolf Wetland Ecologist

    Scheduling and coordination of field activities. Complete fieldactivities and quality control; field sampling and analysis, datacollection, review, analysis, verification, database population andtransmission.

    Prepare documents and reports. Schedule field activities.

    A5 – Problem Definition/Background

    Water quality monitoring for 21 Section 319(h) projects that arebeing locally implemented under subgrants from Ohio EPA.

    1. Where appropriate, and as staffing resources allow, establishbaseline biological and physical habitat quality in Section 319(h)project water bodies by evaluating fish and macroinvertebrateassemblages, wetland plant communities, and/or by assessingphysical habitat conditions. Where applicable, this may includeevaluation of the attainment status of designated or recommendedaquatic life uses, or wetland antidegradation categories of thewater bodies expected to be restored by each project.

    2. Where appropriate, and as staffing resources allow,post-project biological monitoring is proposed to occur again atSection 319(h) project sites where restoration work has beencompleted for at least one year.

    3. Where appropriate, and as staffing resources allow, a reportsummarizing the biological and physical habitat results by projectwill be provided.

    A6 – Project Task/Description

    Any collected data would ideally provide insight intopre-implementation water resource conditions at each of the projectareas. The biological assessment and physical habitat data are usedto assign/confirm the appropriate aquatic life use, determineaquatic life use (ALU) attainment status, and assess physicalhabitat condition at each water body project area.Post-construction biological community and physical habitatconditions (at least one year after project completion) is used tocompare with baseline monitoring results collected prior to projectimplementation.

    A6.1 – Project Descriptions

    The following summaries describe projects that are recommendedfor FY20 Section 319(h) subgrant funding followed by completedprojects that will be evaluated for post project water resourceimprovements. These new projects have been identified during thecourse of the review as having met Section 319(h) eligibilityrequirements and having the highest potential for water qualityimprovements within the watershed where they will be implemented.Each of these projects was reviewed by Region 5 Nonpoint Source(NPS) Program staff. Ohio EPA anticipates having all Subgrant fundsobligated (contracted) for these projects within approximately 12months following award of Ohio EPA’s Section 319(h) program grantfrom USEPA Region 5. All pre-implementation 319(h) projects areassigned to the following EA3 project: Grant Year 2020 319 Projects(Pre-Project Monitoring).

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    20(h)EPA-15 (Figure 1) Bainbridge Township Project Contact: JimStanek, 440-543-9871 X 6302, [emailprotected]

    Smith Creek Restoration at Centerville Mills Park BainbridgeTownship proposes to modify and/or remove approximately 750 linearfeet of eroding embankment along Lake Paterek and restore at least750 linear feet of Smith Creek, which is channelized andhydrologically disconnected to its floodplain along the lakeembankment at Centerville Mills Park, a public park. In addition,this restoration by Bainbridge Township will also convert theimpounded lake to a wetland with a remaining ponded area thatcombines public fishing area with newly planted wetland habitat.Smith Creek is designated Coldwater Habitat (CWH) and is atributary to the State Scenic River, the Aurora Branch of theChagrin River. Smith Creek is located in the Headwaters AuroraBranch 12-digit HUC watershed (12-digit HUC: 04110003-03-02).

    Project Deliverables

    • Restore 750 linear feet of stream channel and riparianfloodplain • Remove & treat 0.25 acres of invasive species •Plant 1.0 acre of trees, shrubs and/or live stakes in riparianareas • Removal of 1 dam • Wetland reconstruction and restoration,and native plantings for 3 acres • Conduct public education andoutreach by developing 1 press release; creating/maintaining 2websites;

    installing 1 project sign; conducting 1 CRWP Board of Directorspresentation; and preparing 1 CRWP Annual Report

    Environmental Results: Restoration of Smith Creek and therestoration of adjacent wetland habitats will improve thehydrologic function and habitat quality of the stream at theproject site and provide water quality benefits to downstreamreaches of Smith Creek and the State Scenic Aurora Branch of theChagrin River. Site-specific goals for this project are to achievea post-construction QHEI score of 62 for this coldwater streamthrough improvements to riparian zone, substrate, and channelmorphology in the stream restoration reach. Estimated loadreductions using U.S. EPA Region 5 Model includes: nitrogen (363.4lbs./year), phosphorus (181.7 lbs./year), and sediment (181.7tons/year). 20(h)EPA-18 (Figure 2) Doan Brook Watershed Partnership(DBWP) Project Representative: Victoria Mills, 216-325-7781,[emailprotected] Sowinski Park Restoration Thisproject will restore a 600-foot reach of Doan Brook at SowinskiPark within the historic Cleveland Cultural Gardens along MartinLuther King Jr. Drive. The project will replace failing channelwalls segments with natural streambank and floodplain. Successfulcompletion will also increase acreage of wetland oxbow habitatplanted with native plantings.

    Project Deliverables

    • Restore 600 linear feet of stream channel and riparianfloodplain • Plant 0.6 acres of trees, shrubs and/or live stakes inriparian areas • Conduct public education and outreach bydeveloping 1 project fact sheet, conducting 1 public meeting,

    developing 1 press release, creating/maintaining 2 websites,installation of 1 project signs, conducting 2 tours, conducting 2field days, compile 2 DBWP annual reports, 2 presentations for DBWPBoard of Trustees Meeting & CRWP Board of Directors Meeting,and 2 E-blasts for DBWP and CRWP.

    Environmental Results: These improvements are expected todecrease bank erosion and sediment pollution and improve streamhabitat metrics along with annual load reductions: phosphorus (104lbs./year), sediment (104 tons/year), and nitrogen (207lbs./year).

    mailto:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]

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    20(h)EPA-18 (Figure 3) Lucas County Engineer's Office ProjectRepresentative: Michael D. Pniewski, P.E., P.S., (419)213-2860,[emailprotected] Two Stage Ditch Restoration in Van FleetDitch - Phase 2

    In 2019, Lucas County was awarded funding through a Great LakesRestoration Initiative (GLRI) grant to implement a two-stage ditchrestoration project to restore floodplain functionality to anapproximately 0.75 mile stretch of Van Fleet Ditch between WeckerlyRoad and Keener Road. This proposed project, Two-Stage DitchRestoration in Van Fleet Ditch: Phase Two, seeks to extend thefirst phase of Van Fleet Ditch with an additional 0.42 miles ofrestoration. Phase 2 will align with Phase 1 activities torecognize efficiencies in the design and construction process.

    Project Deliverables

    • Construct 2,215 linear feet of two-stage ditch channel andrestore riparian floodplain • Plant 2 acres of native grasses inriparian area • Install 2 instream habitat structures • Draft 4Standard Easem*nt Legal Language documents and execute 4 landownercontracts • Develop 1 project fact sheet, conduct 1 public meeting,develop 2 press releases, create/maintain 1 project

    website, install 2 project signs, conduct 1 tour, develop 2newsletters.

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this projectwill increase floodplain connectivity and help restore ecologicalfunction within a highly constrained and channelized agriculturalsetting by creating a vegetated floodplain bench that will reducesediment and nutrient loads, create instream habitat, and improvewater quality in a waterway that contributes to the Maumee River.U.S. EPA StepL Load Reduction Model estimates annual loadreductions of: phosphorus (47 lbs./year), sediment (25.4tons/year), and nitrogen (120 lbs./year).

    20(h)EPA-23 (Figure 4) Project Contact: Kristen Trolio,216-635-3244, [emailprotected]

    Wolf Creek Restoration

    Cleveland Metroparks will restore and stabilize 1,200 linearfeet of stream and riparian area along Wolf Creek in Garfield ParkReservation using stabilization using natural channel design andbioengineering. Floodplain connectivity along this stretch of creekwill be restored. 2 acres of riparian area will be treated forinvasive plant control and planted with native grasses and 1.25acres of trees, shrubs, and/or live stakes.

    Project Deliverables

    • Restore +/- 1,200lf of streambank along Wolf Creek usingnatural channel design and bioengineering. • Provide streambedgrade control via 3-5 constructed grade control structures along+/- 1,200lf of stream. • Install 2-4 erosion and sediment controlstructures • Restore +/- 1,200lf of riparian area along Wolf Creek,including +/- 2 acres of invasive species control, +/-2 acres

    native grass plantings, and +/- 1.25 acres of tree, shrub,and/or live stake plantings in riparian areas. • Reduce sedimentand nutrient loads in Wolf Creek that are the result of eroding andunstable streambanks. • Prepare for future phases of thelarge-scale restoration project in Garfield Park Reservation,including re-

    creation of the +/- 2.25-acre recreational pond and +/- 3 acresof wetlands. • Conduct 1 public meeting, conduct 1 press release,install 1 project sign, conduct 1 tour, conduct 2 volunteer

    events, produce 3 social media posts

    mailto:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]

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    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this projectwill improve habitat and riparian areas through this reach of WolfCreek. It will reduce sediment and nutrient loads in Wolf Creekthat are the result of eroding and unstable streambanks. Thisproject is expected to yield estimated load reductions ofphosphorus 29.9 (lbs./year), sediment (125.4 tons/year), andnitrogen (64.9 lbs./year). It will also Improve resilience of WolfCreek to better respond to climate change, including severe stormsand long droughts

    20(h)EPA-17 (Figure 5) Holmes County Engineer's Office ProjectContact: Christopher Young, (330 )674-1856,[emailprotected] Rush Run Stream Restoration andStabilization

    This project aims to restore 1378 linear feet of Rush and 2.5riparian acres adjacent to the stream Run in the Tea Run-KillbuckCreek watershed. Rush Run is severely eroded at this location dueto historic livestock grazing activities in and nearby the stream.This project location will be protected by a conservationeasem*nt.

    Project Deliverables

    • Restore 1378 linear feet of flood plain • Restore 1378 linearfeet of stream channel, including restoring more natural flow •Install 5 instream habitat structures • Install 2 grade controlstructures • Restore 1378 linear feet of streambank byre-contouring or regrading • Plant 2.5 acres of native grasses,trees, shrubs and/or live stakes in riparian areas • Draft standardeasem*nt legal language, complete 1 appraisal report, execute 1landowner contract, acquire 2.5

    acres of conservation easem*nt.

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this project isanticipated to yield: improved measured bank stability; increasesin aquatic habitat metrics; and annual load reductions: nitrogen(137 lbs./year), phosphorus (52 lbs./year) and sediment (84tons/year).

    20(h)EPA-06 (Figure 6) Geauga Park District Project Contact:Paul Pira (Park Biologist), (440)279-0812,[emailprotected] Spring Brook Restoration

    This project aims to restore 500 linear feet of Spring Brook (acoldwater habitat tributary) and adjacent 2.5 riparian acres in theBeaver Creek-Chagrin River watershed. Stream Daylighting andRestoration: The Project Team will day-light approximately 550 feetof an existing 48-inch concrete pipe that enters the park from thesouthwest and is exhibiting signs of failure, including separationat the pipe joints and the formation of large sinkholes. The pipewill be removed, and a natural stream channel constructed in itsplace. The restored stream reach will be stabilized with up to two(2) riffles, two (2) buried rock grade control structures, and one(1) energy dissipation pool.

    Project Deliverables

    • Restore 500 linear feet of stream channel, including theday-lighting of approximately 500 feet of existing 48-in. concretepipe. Re-contour and stabilize streambanks.

    • Restore 2 acres of riparian habitat floodplain, includinginvasive species treatment/removal and native plantings of trees,shrubs and/or live Stakes

    mailto:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]

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    • Conduct public education and outreach by developing 1 factsheet and 1 press release, creating/maintaining 2 websites,installing 1 project signs, conducting 1 tours, developing 1newsletter, compile 1 CRWP annual report, 1 presentation for CRWPBoard of Directors Meeting.

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this project isanticipated to yield: improved measured stream bank stability;increases in fish community, and aquatic habitat metrics; andannual load reductions: nitrogen (78 lbs./year), phosphorus (39lbs./year), and sediment (39 tons/year). Loading reductions shouldalso benefit Bass Lake downstream. Bass lake has recurringchallenges with nutrient loading and potentially harmful algalblooms.

    20(h)EPA-14 (Figure 7) Tinker's Creek Watershed Partners ProjectContact: Kate Chapel, (440)897-3905,[emailprotected] Brandywine Creek StreamRestoration at Owen Brown

    This project will restore approximately 1,500 linear feet of anunnamed tributary to Brandywine Creek at River Mile 10.07,including 1200 linear feet of streambank restoration. The projecttributary is channelized, entrenched, and disconnected from theactive floodplain. 2.5 acres of riparian restoration (via tree,shrub and native grass plantings) is included. This project isdesigned to address total dissolved solids, direct habitatalterations, nutrients, flow alteration, and organic enrichmentfrom sources that include urban runoff/storm sewers, landdevelopment/suburbanization, and road runoff (non-constructionrelated).

    Project Deliverables

    • Restore 1,500 linear feet of stream channel • Install 7 gradecontrol structures • Stabilize 1,200 linear feet of streambankusing bioengineering • Remove/treat 3 acres for invasive species •Plant 2.5 acres of trees, shrubs, and/or live stakes in riparianareas • Conduct public education and outreach by: developing 2 factsheet and 1 press release, conduct 3 public

    meeting, create/maintain 1 website, install 1 project signs,conduct 1 tour, conduct 1 field day, conduct 1 workshop, develop 7newsletters, develop 2 project rendering documents for print

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this project isanticipated to yield: improved aquatic habitat metrics and measuredstream bank stability. Estimated load reductions will include -nitrogen (252 lbs./year), phosphorus (125. 7 lbs./year), andsediment (125. 7 tons/year).

    mailto:[emailprotected]

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    20(h)EPA-20 (Figure 8) Belmont Soil and Water ConservationDistrict Project Contact: Brooke Sanderson, (740)526–0027,[emailprotected] Crabapple Creek CrossingImprovement

    This relatively small project will stabilize the stream bank byinstalling articulated concrete block matting at the vehiclecrossing to decrease erosion and sediment load. This projectaddresses a known sediment source and problem location. CrabappleCreek is a direct tributary to Captina Creek, an Outstanding StateWater, Aquatic Resource of National Importance, and the only knownwatershed in Ohio that supports breeding populations of the EasternHellbender Salamander. One of the greatest threats to the EasternHellbender and water quality throughout Ohio is sedimentation.

    Project Deliverables

    • Install 1 erosion control structure • Restore 20 linear feetof streambank by re-contouring or regrading • Execute 1 landownercontract • Develop 1 project fact sheet and 3 press releases,install 2 project signs, develop 1 display, conduct 1 tour,

    develop 1 newsletter

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this project isexpected to reduce sediment loadings in Crabapple Creek by at least1200 lbs./year (0.6. ton/year). Captina Creek downstream fromCrabapple Creek will also benefit from reduced sedimentloadings.

    20(h)EPA-05 (Figure 9) Grand Lake St. Marys Lake FacilitiesAuthority Project Contact: Theresa Dirksen, (419)586-4209,[emailprotected] Gilliland Nature PreserveWetland/Natural Area Development This project will restoreapproximately 9.4 acres of wetlands and upland habitat on land soonto be owned by the Grand Lake St. Marys Lake Facilities Authority(LFA). This project will help prevent future residential orcommercial development around Grand Lake St. Marys. ProjectDeliverables

    • Reconstruct and restore 2.0 acres of wetlands • Install onestop log structure • Plant 5.4 acres of wetland species • Plant 1.5acres of trees • Construct a 0.5 acres walking path • Conduct 1public meeting, create/maintain 1 website, install 1 project sign,develop 1 display, conduct 1 tour

    Environmental Results: This project will help prevent futureresidential or commercial development around Grand Lake St. Marys.Based on the US EPA StepL load reduction calculator, this projectwill result in a nitrogen load reduction of 60 pounds per year; aphosphorus load reduction of 19 pounds per year; and a sedimentload reduction of 13.5 tons per year.

    mailto:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]

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    20(h)EPA-29 (Figure 10) City of Mentor Project Contact: KennKaminski, (440)974-5722, [emailprotected] SpringbrookGarden Park Stream Restoration – Phase 2

    This project, located in a public park in the MarshCreek-Frontal Lake Erie watershed, is a second phase to a wetlandand floodplain restoration that is currently underway justdownstream of this project site. Phase 2 is designed tore-establish the ecological and natural function in a formeragricultural ditch, stabilize both stream banks, remove invasiveplants, and restore riparian habitat.

    Project Deliverables

    • Restore 650 linear feet of floodplain, stream channel, andnatural streamflow • Install 2 instream habitat structures •Restore & stabilize 1300 linear feet of streambank usingbioengineering • Restore 650 linear feet of streambank usingre-contouring or regrading • Plant 1 acre of native grass inriparian area • Plant 1 acre of trees, shrubs, and/or live stakesin riparian area • Remove/treat 0.5 acres of invasive species •Conduct public education and outreach by developing 1 fact sheet, 1press release, create/maintain 2 websites,

    install 1 project sign, and develop 1 newsletter

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this project inexpected to result in reductions in overall discharge volume andpeak runoff by means increasing settling of suspended solids,filtration, and nutrient uptake by floodplain plants. Anticipatedresults: improvement to aquatic habitat metrics; and annual loadreductions: nitrogen (166 lbs./year), phosphorus (83 lbs./year) andsediment (98 tons /year).

    20(h)EPA-26 (Figure 11) City of Sharonville Project Contact:Bennett Kottler, (513)563-8800, [emailprotected]Twin Creek Wetland Enhancement

    The Project proposes adjusting the elevation of the invert pipesconnecting the wetland to the Mill Creek mainstem and the base flowof the East Fork Mill Creek. Wetland inlets will be excavated,lowered, and replaced with new inlet piping. Three heavy ironflapper gates will be replaced with light and durable aluminumgates to increase water flow into the wetland. Approximately 120cubic yards of existing swales will be reshaped to betterdistribute water throughout the wetlands. 5 acres of wetland willbe reconnected to the stream system. Minor invasive plant removalwill occur and be replaced with 0.2 acres of planted native wetlandspecies.

    Project Deliverables • Construct 2 inlet channels and 1 outletchannel • Install 2 stop-log structure/flapper gates • Reconstruct,restore, and reconnect 5.0 acres of wetland to stream • Remove 0.2acres of invasives and replant with wetland species • Install 1water control device • Develop 1 project fact sheet, conduct 1public meeting, develop 1 press release, create/maintain 1website,

    install 1 project sign, conduct 1 tour, conduct 1 field day,develop 1 newsletter

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this projectwill improve water flow into and through the Twin Creeks wetlandarea. Annual load reductions: nitrogen (25 lbs./year), phosphorus(33 lbs./year) and sediment (36 tons/year).

    mailto:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]

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    20(h)EPA-28 (Figure 12) Black Swamp Conservancy Project Contact:Melanie Coulter, (419)833-1025, [emailprotected] MarieDeLarme Wetland Restoration

    The Project Area is 8 acres of an agricultural tract owned bythe Black Swamp Conservancy (BWC). The tract has been inagricultural (hay) production since 2004. The 8-acre project arealies in the floodplain of Marie DeLarme Creek. About 5 of the 8acres have wetland hydrology and soils. This project will restore 2acres of vernal pool wetlands to promote longer water retention inthe floodplain; and restore the remaining 6 acres to riparianwoodland by seeding the site with native riparian species andplanting native trees and shrubs.

    Project Deliverables • Reconstruct and restore 2.0 acres ofwetlands • Plant 2 acres of wetland species • Treat/remove 2 acresof invasive species • Develop 1 project fact sheet, develop 1 pressrelease, create/maintain 1 website, install 1 project sign, conduct1

    tour, conduct 1 field day, develop 1 newsletter

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this projectwill convert existing agricultural fields into a functioningwetland habitat, reducing nutrients and sediment export into MarieDeLarme Creek and the Maumee River. Annual load reductions areconsistent with loads expected from converting agricultural land towooded riparian as follows: nitrogen (33 lbs./year), phosphorus (6lbs./year), and sediment (1 ton/year).

    20(h)EPA-28 (Figure 13)

    The Nature Conservancy Project Contact: Andrew Bishop,(216)310-2661, [emailprotected] Restore Headcuts inBrecksville Reservation Headwater Streams

    This project focuses on improving severely eroded headwatertributaries within the Brecksville Reservation (WillowLake-Cuyahoga River watershed), with a high percentage of developedurban contributing land-use. Approximately 6000 linear feet ofheadwater tributaries will be restored through the installation ofapproximately 250 in-stream habitat structures (simulated log-jamhabitat features). The log jams are designed to mimic naturalaccumulatio of woody debris and organic material to capture erodedsediment and dissipation stream energy. Structures will beconstructed using existing deadfall and branches in the immediatevicinity of the head cuts. This project is built as aproof-of-concept for applying this approach with paraprofessionalsthroughout the Cuyahoga Valley. Our outreach effort will build onCM's Watershed Volunteer Program (WVP} and Cuyahoga Valley NationalPark's strong volunteer program.

    Project Deliverables

    • Restore 6000 linear feet of stream channel by installing 250simulated log-jam structures

    • Conduct public education and outreach by developing 1 projectfact sheet, installing 4 project signs, conducting 2 field days,developing 1 newsletter article, and 4 posts to social media.

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this projectwill reduce rates of erosion and entrenchment in headwater streamsthroughout the project area. Anticipated results: improved bankstability; and annual load reductions: nitrogen (325 lbs./year),phosphorus (160 lbs./year), and sediment (160 tons/year).

    mailto:[emailprotected]:[emailprotected]

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    20(h)EPA-31 (Figure 14) Mill Creek Alliance Project Contact:Bennett Kottler, (513)563-8800, [emailprotected]Mill Creek Low-Head Dam Mitigation, River Mile 12.2

    This project builds on previous low-head dam mitigation projectsalong the Mill Creek, including two recent completions in the Cityof Cincinnati parallel to Spring Grove Avenue, and previousmitigation projects at Hartwell Golf Course, Center Hill Avenue,and Hopple Street. With the goal of eliminating all low-head dambarriers in the Mill Creek Watershed, this project proposes tomodify one additional dam. As seen at our other project sites,constructing rock riffles downstream of a Mill Creek dam restoresnatural, free-flowing habitat, and improves water quality in arelatively short period of time.

    Oxygenation increases microbial processing of stream water whilealso allowing fish passage. Physical removal of water qualitypollutants increases by capture and storage in stream sediment inthe induced pool between the riffle and the upstream dam. Theprocess begins by filling the scour pool downstream of the low headdam, and may eventually take up about half of the volume of theinduced pool behind the constructed riffle.

    Project Deliverables • Modify 1 dam structure • Restore 1100linear feet of natural flow • Dispose of 1 cubic yard of debris •Install 1 fish passage and/or habitat structures • Draft 2 standardeasem*nt legal language, complete 2 appraisal reports, execute 2landowner contracts • Conduct public education and outreach by:developing 1 fact sheet and 1 press release, conduct 1 public

    meeting, install 1 project sign, create/maintain 1 website, hold2 tours via canoe, conduct 1 stream clean up, and develop onenewsletter

    Environmental Results: Successful completion of this projectwill yield: restoration of 1100 linear feet natural flow; improvedaquatic habitat and fish bio-metrics; and anticipated annual loadreductions of nitrogen (52 lbs./year), phosphorus (22 lbs./year),and sediment (18 tons/year).

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    Ohio Division Natural Resources Sponsored Projects ProjectContact: Christina Kuchle ([emailprotected]) Maumee- St. Joseph River Confluence Wetland Expansion (Figure 15)

    Ohio Department of Natural Resources - Division of Natural Areasand Preserves, Williams County A combination of nutrient-reductionpractices is planned for this project site, which currently has 20acres in agricultural use. Efforts include decommissioningsubsurface drainage tiles, expansion of existing wetlands, andcreation of new ones. Native vegetation, including shrubs andsedges, will be planted to help hold nutrients on the land,preventing them from entering nearby waterways. A deciduous forestof native trees also will be restored, within which nutrient andsediment-trapping vernal pools will naturally occur. The projectsize is 140 Acres and will be completed in partnership with theBlack Swamp Conservancy. Environmental Results: ODNR Rated high fornutrient removal. Successful completion of this project isestimated to yield loading reductions of nitrogen (1650 lbs./year),phosphorus (140 lbs./year), and sediment (19 tons/year).

    St. Joseph's River Wetland Restoration & SustainableAgriculture (Figure 16)

    Ohio Department of Natural Resources - Division of Natural Areasand Preserves, Williams County The project will protect and restorea considerable amount of natural forested wetland along the St.Joseph River, while retaining enough tillable acres to establish asmall to mid-size sustainable farming operation. 54 acres of theproperty would be restored (27 acres of wetlands and 27 acres ofnon-hydric reforestation), 1,600 linear feet of channelrestoration, 14 acres of agricultural land would be retained and 26acres of existing habitat would be protected. It will providesignificant nutrient reduction due to wetland restoration, streamrestoration and reduce runoff from tree planting.

    Environmental Results: ODNR Rated high for nutrient removal.Successful completion of this project is estimated to yield loadingreductions of nitrogen (940 lbs./year), phosphorus (80 lbs./year),and sediment (11 tons/year).

    Sandusky River Redhorse Bend Wetland Restoration (Figure 17)

    Ohio Department of Natural Resources - Division of Natural Areasand Preserves, Sandusky County /Sandusky River Watershed

    This project will reconnect 55 acres of floodplain habitat tothe Sandusky River, including wetland and riparian restoration. Twoditches flowing through the site will be restored to headwaterstreams to enhance the natural filtration of surface water runoff.This project will be completed in partnership with the Black SwampConservancy.

    Environmental Results: ODNR Rated high for nutrient removal.Successful completion of this project is estimated to yield loadingreductions of nitrogen (320 lbs./year), phosphorus (81 lbs./year),and sediment (32 tons/year).

    Environmental Results: ODNR Rated high for nutrient removal.Successful completion of this project is estimated to yield loadingreductions of nitrogen (2000 lbs./year), phosphorus (160lbs./year), and sediment (27 tons/year).

    Forder Bridge Wetland Restoration & Treatment System (Figure18)

    Ohio Department of Natural Resources - Division of Natural Areasand Preserves, Paulding County, Ohio 041000050205

    This project proposes to proposes to 1) install a series ofwetlands where the stream enters the property; 2) recontour thebanks of the stream to reconnect it to its floodplain in at leasttwo areas between the proposed wetlands and the eroded reach; 3)install riffle grade control structures in at least the lower reachof the stream to stabilize the channel. Black Swamp Conservancyowns and manages the Preserve. 2,600 linear feet of an intermittentstream run through the middle of Forder Bridge and into the MaumeeRiver. The stream has a wooded buffer along most of its length,except where it

    mailto:[emailprotected]

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    first enters the property from a culvert on CR 424. The lowerreach of the stream is severely eroding. The stream drains an areaof about 0.1 square mile, including about 20 acres of activelyfarmed land and the 30 acres of recently reforested retiredfarmland at Forder Bridge. Doing wetland and stream restoration atthis site would allow water from 100% of the drainage to interactwith the restoration practices once installed. The pollutionestimate below does not consider elimination of eroding streamarea.

    Environmental Results: ODNR Rated high for nutrient removal.Successful completion of this project is estimated to yield loadingreductions of nitrogen (440 lbs./year), phosphorus (30 lbs./year),and sediment (6 tons/year).

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    Table 1. Sampling locations for SFY2020 Section 319(h) projects.All projects are pre-project monitoring.

    Station Stream or receiving waterbody

    Station Name River Code

    RM DA Lat Long Project Sampling

    D01G20 Smith Creek SMITH CREEK @ YMCA CAMP FOOTBRIDGE15-005-

    001 0.50 10.50 41.34892 -81.336473 Smith Creek RestorationF,Mq,H

    200135 Doan Brook DOAN BROOK AT CLEVELAND @ ROCKEFELLER PARK

    19-039-000 1.40 8.50 41.525715 -81.626429 Sowinski ParkRestoration F,Mq,H

    302025 Van Fleet Ditch VAN FLEET DITCH W OF MONCLOVA @ KEENERRD.

    04-003-007 1.00 2.20 41.5539278 -83.7523861

    Two Stage Ditch Van Fleet Ditch-Ph. 2 F,Mq,H

    304200 Wolf Creek WOLF CREEK NEAR MOUTH 19-006-

    003 0.15 2.18 41.4297 -81.6044333 Wolf Creek RestorationF,Mq,H

    203633 Rush Run RUSH RUN NW OF HOLMESVILLE @ CO. RD. 1

    17-178-000 0.90 5.25 40.659034 -81.971014

    Rush Run Restoration & Stabilization F,Mq,H

    D01W32 Spring Brook SPRING BROOK (TRIB. TO CHAGRIN R, 47.65) @INTER-URBAN

    15-001-019 0.30 0.20 41.550376 -81.229839 Spring BrookRestoration F,Mq,H

    304201 Trib. to Brandywine Creek (10.07)

    TRIB. TO BRANDYWINE CREEK (10.07) @ W. PROSPECT ST.

    19-010-002 0.40 2.20 41.24781 -81.445196

    Brandywine Creek Stream Restoration F,Mq,H

    303953 Crabapple Creek CRABAPPLE CREEK @ TWP. RD. 84 06-110-

    000 3.5 2.70 39.86446 -80.998498 Crabapple Ck CrossingImprovements F,Mq,H

    304209 Grand Lake St. Mary’s GILLIAND WETLAND NATUREPRESERVE

    22-999-000 n/a n/a 40.504722 -84.489444

    Gilliland Nature Preserve Wetland/Natural Area Development

    W

    304202 Marsh Creek MARSH CREEK @ SPRINGBROOK GARDENS PARK

    03-026-000 3.90 0.95 41.6863269 -81.3052825

    Springbrook Restoration, Phase 2 F,Mq,H

    304210 East Fork Mill Creek TWIN CREEK WETLAND 23-006-000 n/an/a 39.291817 -84.433774 Twin Creek Wetland Enhancement W

    304211 Marie DeLarme Creek FOREST WOODS NATURE PRESERVEWETLAND

    04-056-000 n/a n/a 41.236016 -84.66643

    Marie DeLarme Wetland Restoration W

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    Station Stream or receiving waterbody

    Station Name River Code

    RM DA Lat Long Project Sampling

    302646 Trib. to Cuyahoga River (21.7)

    TRIB. TO CUYAHOGA R. (21.70) NEAR BRECKSVILLE, UPST. W. BR.

    19-001-036 0.8 1.0 41.2968 -81.5839

    Headcut Treatments in Brecksville Reservation

    F,Mq,H

    304204 Trib. to Cuyahoga River (22.65)

    TRIB. TO CUYAHOGA R. (22.65) UPST RIVERVIEW RD.

    19-001-049 0.4 0.05 41.2957 -81.576142 F,Mq,H

    304205 Trib. to Cuyahoga River (23.4)

    TRIB. TO CUYAHOGA RIVER (23.4) NEAR BUCKEYE TRAIL

    19-001-050 0.9 0.5 41.286409 -81.578874 F,Mq,H

    304203 Mill Creek MILL CREEK @ CLARK RD. 23-001-000 12.2 73.339.216153 -84.45002 Mill Creek Low-Head Dam Mitigation, River Mile12.2 F,Mq,H

    304212 St. Joseph River ST. JOSEPH RIVER CONFLUENCE WETLAND04-000-

    000 - - 41.647908 -84.568193 Maumee - St. Joseph RiverConfluence Wetland Expansion

    W

    304206 Trib. to St. Joseph River (61.4) TRIB. TO ST. JOSEPH R.(61.4) NEAR MOUTH

    04-400-002 0.1 0.2 41.514654 -84.705114

    St. Joseph's River Wetland Restoration & SustainableAgriculture

    F,Mq,H,W

    201316 Sandusky River SANDUSKY R. @ U.S. RT. 20 05-001-

    000 13.7 1264 41.366752 -83.106819 Sandusky River Redhorse BendWetland Restoration H,W

    304207 Trib. to Maumee River (91.6) TRIB. TO MAUMEE RIVER (91.6)DST. CO. RD. 424

    04-001-017 0.1 1.2 41.221175 -84.672561

    Forder Bridge Wetland Restoration & Treatment System

    F,Mq,H,W

    F –fish sampling Mq– macroinvertebrate qualitative sampling H –Habitat sampling W – wetland sampling DA – Drainage Area (mi2) RM –River Mile.

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    Table 2. Ohio EPA field sampling load for the 319(h) studyareas, 2020.

    Sample Type No. Sites

    Fish Stations (total) 15

    Macrobenthos (total) 15

    Qualitative (Natural Substrates) 15

    Habitat 16

    Wetland 7

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    Figure 1 – Project area for Smith Creek Restoration

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    Figure 2 – Project area overview for Sowinski ParkRestoration.

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    Figure 3 – Project area overview for Two Stage Ditch Van FleetDitch-Ph. 2

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    Figure 4 - Project area overview for Wolf Creek Restoration.

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    Figure 5 - Project area overview for Rush Run Restoration &Stabilization.

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    Figure 6 - Project area overview for Spring Brook Restoration.Figure obtained from grant application

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    Figure 7 - Project area overview for Brandywine Creek StreamRestoration.

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    Figure 8 - Project area overview for Crabapple Ck. CrossingImprovements.

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    Figure 9 - Project area overview for Gilliland Nature PreserveWetland/Natural Area Development.

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    Figure 10 - Project area overview for Springbrook Restoration,Phase 2.

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    Figure 11 - Project area overview for Twin Creek WetlandEnhancement

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    Figure 12 - Project area overview for Marie DeLarme WetlandRestoration.

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    Figure 13 - Project area overview for Headcut Treatments inBrecksville Reservation. Figure is from derived from projectapplication. Superimposed red circles represent pre-monitoringsampling locations. Smaller dots represent head-cutting areas inthe watershed, with “hottest” colors representing the greatestamounts of erosion.

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    Figure 14 – Project area overview for Mill Creek Low-Head DamMitigation, River Mile 12.2

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    Figure 15 – Project area overview for Maumee – St. Joseph RiverConfluence: Agricultural Land to Wetland Conversion

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    Figure 16 – Project area overview for St. Joseph's River WetlandRestoration & Sustainable Agriculture. Part of the projectinvolves restoring the waterway running through the property.

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    Figure 17 - Project area overview for Sandusky River RedhorseBend Wetland Restoration.

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    Figure 18 - Project area overview for Forder Bridge WetlandRestoration & Treatment System.

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    A7 – Quality Objectives and Criteria

    To gather ambient environmental information (biological,physical habitat) within 319 project areas to assess environmentalbenefits realized from implementation. Collection of vegetationdata on riparian and wetland plant communities and assign wetlandantidegradation categories when applicable.

    A8 – Special Training/Certification

    Ohio EPA’s Division of Surface Water (DSW) has developed anAccess database called “TrainTrack” to document initial andrefresher trainings. All staff involved in collecting any type ofenvironmental sample must complete training associated with thatsampling method. The first line supervisors shall ensure staff havethe necessary safety and skill set training (initial and refreshertraining) prior to sampling. Biological trainings and qualityassurance refresher activities are described in the BiologicalCriteria Manual Volume 3 (Ohio EPA 2015b). Initial training orrefresher trainings are conducted annually for Ohio EPA staff (bothfull time and intermittent) that will be collecting biologicaland/or habitat sampling.

    A9 – Documents and Records

    The study team leader will provide a copy of the final QAPP tothe appropriate project personnel by email as detailed in thedistribution list. As the plan is updated, each person on thedistribution list will be sent an email with the most currentdocument. The most current date of revision will be included in thedocument name and in the header of the document.

    The biological and habitat forms, chain of custody forms, samplesubmission forms, Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity (VIBI) dataforms, and field logs will be maintained in their original form andinformation from those forms will be included in Agency databases.The databases are backed up on secure servers.

    The format for all data recording will be consistent with therequirements and procedures used for data validation and assessmentdescribed in this QAPP. Files generated according to applicable andattached standard operating procedures (such as raw data, resultsof QC checks, problems encountered, etc.) will be documented andreported to the study team.

    All communications regarding study plan changes or refinements,such as changes to sites, staff, parameters, etc., will be filed inthe Sharepoint project file by the study team leader. Other majoractions which might affect the DQOs, project leader changes, etc.,will require an updated QAPP with a new signoff sheet.

    A9.1 Document/Record Control

    The recording media for the project will be a combination ofpaper and electronic means to document site conditions. Datagathered using paper will be recorded using indelible ink, andchanges to such data records will be made by drawing a single linethrough the error with an initial by the responsible person.Similar methods will be used for electronic data recording.

    The study team leader will retain the most recent version of theQAPP and be responsible for distribution of the current version ofthe QAPP to the project team. Agency management and the QualityAssurance Crew (QAC) will approve updates to the QAPP as needed.The study leader will retain copies of all management reports,memoranda, and all correspondence between team members identifiedin Section A. Retention of records should emphasize any deviationsfrom the signed QAPP, including the rationale for thosechanges.

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    A9.2 Document Storage

    A SharePoint project file will act as a central repository forall documents collected or generated relevant to this project. Allproject documents will be scanned in and stored electronically onthe project SharePoint file and hardcopies will be stored at anOhio EPA office. Project photos will be moved to and stored in theLynx Photo System. All files will be retained by Ohio EPA inaccordance with its records retention policy.

    All communications regarding study plan changes or refinements,such as changes to sites, staff, parameters, etc., will be filed inthe SharePoint project file by the study team leader. Other majoractions which might affect the DQOs, project leader changes, etc.,will require an updated QAPP with a new signoff sheet.

    Section B – Data Generation and Acquisition

    B1 – Sampling Process Design This small study includes samplinglocations that encompass various water quality enhancementprojects. Ohio EPA intends to measure biological and habitatquality before and after project implementation. Data collectionwill be performed using standards methods and frequencies asdescribed in Ohio EPA 2105ab. As resources allow, all pre-projectfield assessments will be conducted during the 2020 field samplingseason. Post-project sampling will occur after successful projectimplementation and after each project has had enough time tomature. In many instances, it may take several years afterimplementation to fully realize all environmental benefits fromsome projects.

    B2 – Sampling Methods

    Stream Habitat Assessment

    Stream habitat is evaluated using either the Qualitative HabitatEvaluation Index (QHEI) or Headwater Habitat Evaluation Index(HHEI) developed by the Ohio EPA for streams, rivers, and otherprimary drainages in Ohio (Ohio EPA 1989b, 2006, 2009). Variousattributes of the available habitat are scored based on theiroverall importance to the establishment of viable, diverse aquaticfaunas. Evaluations of type and quality of substrate, amount ofinstream cover, channel morphology, extent of riparian canopy, pooland riffle development and quality, and stream gradient are amongthe metrics used to evaluate the characteristics of a streamsegment.

    Biological Community Assessment

    Qualitative macroinvertebrate sampling will be conducted at allsampling locations. This sampling effort consists of an inventoryof all observed macroinvertebrate taxa from the natural streamhabitats at each site with no attempt to quantify populations otherthan notations on the predominance of specific taxa or taxa groupswithin major macrohabitat types (e.g., riffle, run, pool, margin).Detailed macroinvertebrate assemblage sampling protocols aredocumented in Biological Criteria for the Protection of AquaticLife, Volume III (2015c).

    Fish will be sampled once at each sampling location using pulsedDC headwater, wading, or backpack electrofishing methods, dependingon watershed size at each sampling zone (Table 1). Fish areprocessed in the field which includes identifying each individualto species, counting individuals at all sites, weighing individualsat locations > 20mi2, and recording any external abnormalities.Detailed fish assemblage

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    sampling protocols are documented in Biological Criteria for theProtection of Aquatic Life, Volume III (2015c).

    Depending on site-specific characteristics encountered,biological sampling at locations draining less than

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    B6 – Instrument/Equipment Testing, Inspection, andMaintenance

    The team leaders have several years of experience operating andmaintaining most of the equipment to be used during this project.The team leaders will inspect the equipment prior to and during thesampling. The team leaders will ensure that all equipment remainsin functional working condition.

    All instruments/equipment will be inspected and calibrated priorto use. Other equipment used will follow specifications provided inthe biological and habitat methods cited.

    B7 - Instrument/Equipment Calibration and Frequency

    The team leaders have operated and maintained the equipment thatwill be used during this project for many years. The team leaderswill inspect the equipment prior to and during the sampling. Theteam leaders will ensure that all equipment remains in functionalworking condition. The electrofishing gear undergoes preventivemaintenance, and is repaired or replaced as needed. Use of all fishsampling equipment will follow specifications provided in thebiological methods cited. Newly received equipment is inspected forquality and consistency with previous equipment.

    B8 – Inspection/Acceptance of Supplies and Consumables

    Supplies and consumables will be inspected upon receipt by thefield sampling teams. Nearly all the supplies utilized for thisproject are maintained and used during the normal businessoperations of the Ohio EPA. The field team leaders will beresponsible to ensure that all sample containers and all neededsupplies and consumables are available in advance of all fieldwork. It will be their responsibility to maintain and replenishstock. Consumable supplies include sample containers, ethanol andformalin preservatives, and miscellaneous field supplies such asdistilled water, sampling gear disinfectant, disposable gloves,paper towels, and paper field forms. Field personnel will confirmthat all reagents are within applicable shelf life.

    B9 – Non-Direct Measurements

    Not Applicable

    B10 – Data Management

    B10.1 – EA3

    Knowledge of the Division of Surface Water (DSW) biological datasheets and Ecological Assessment and Analysis Application (EA3)program is needed to manage data. The station ID numbers that areassigned to each sampling location are created using EA3. Projectnames are also created in EA3 so stations can be grouped togetherto facilitate data assessment.

    The sites listed in this study plan table are coded with EA3Station IDs that link data across several tables. They must beincluded on all field, lab and sample sheets and reported with alldata results. If for some reason a location other than the onelisted in the study plan is sampled, and that location is closeenough from the one listed in the table and is fully representativeof the EA3 Station, use the river mile listed in the study plan,and simply record the location information separately. An exactriver mile can be assigned later to an Absolute Location Point(ALP) if warranted. If the location is not representative of thesite listed on the study plan due to distance or a confoundingfactor (e.g. large drainage area change), a new station may bewarranted. All attempts are made to access the sampling location asclose to the point of record as possible, but challenging streamaccess for biological or other sample may preclude this. It isalso

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    imperative that, if a new station is sampled, the study plancoordinator be notified so that this information can be distributedto all the study team.

    B10.2 - YSI® Pro Series Units

    The YSI® Pro Series units have an internal file storage system.A site list based on Station ID # is first created using YSI® ProSeries Data Manager V1.1.8 software installed on a desktop PC. Thefield meter is then connected to the PC via a USB port so the sitelist can be uploaded to the meter. Data is saved in the field byselecting the correct Station from the menu. After sampling iscompleted the files are downloaded to the Data Manager software.They are then exported as an Excel file and, upon completion of thesurvey, are provided to the project manager who designates anetwork folder for retaining the data.

    B10.3- Fish, VIBI, and QHEI Data Sheets

    The original fish, macroinvertebrate, and QHEI field and datasheets will be digitally archived. Original VIBI field and datasheets will be archived at the Lazarus Building. Data from thefield and data sheets are manually entered into EA3 using theappropriate data entry screen. The sheets are double entered andthen approved by the original collector to reduce error rate.

    Section C – Assessment and Oversight

    C1 – Assessments and Response Actions

    C1.1 – Assessments

    Periodic assessment of field sites, field equipment, andlaboratory equipment is necessary to ensure that data obtainedmeets project needs. This is an ongoing process that continuesduring project implementation, as well as on larger scaleassessments that take place less frequently (e.g., annually). Theassessments generally focus on readiness and consistency ofimplementation but also are looking for continual improvementopportunities.

    Daily assessments (for each day of project activities, asapplicable) include assessment of field equipment and supplies,laboratory equipment and supplies, completeness of the day’ssamples and associated field notes, future needs, etc.

    C1.2 - Response Actions

    Despite best preparations, assessments may find situationsrequiring corrective actions. Small day-to-day level assessmentfindings are often addressed by the individual doing the assessmentin the field or in the lab and are common enough to the process anddo not necessitate a formal response.

    Corrective action implementation will be determined by thelikelihood that the situation may affect the quality of the data.Field corrective actions will be brought to the attention of thestudy team for consideration as to their impact on the data, theirpotential interest to other sampling teams/subcontractors, anyfuture considerations for process improvement, and for theirpotential inclusion to the quarterly reports.

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    C1.3 - Reporting and Resolution of Issues

    Any audits or other assessments that reveal findings of practiceor procedure that do not conform to the written QAPP will becorrected as soon as possible. The study team and QA coordinatorwill be notified regarding deviations.

    C1.4 - Data Completeness

    Success of the project will be judged by the resulting datafulfilling the needs outlined in the data objectives. Potentialdata gaps will be monitored as the project progresses and theproject schedule will be revised to fill these gaps where they aredetermined to be significant or to potentially impact thefulfillment of project objectives.

    C2 – Reports to Management

    Monthly oral progress reports are to be provided to managementon the survey/study and what steps are being taken to resolve anyissues or problems. This may include access problems early on thatlead to changes of sites and weather or resource problems duringsampling. After the samples have been evaluated, the team leaderand project biologists will have a meeting to evaluate for anybeneficial use recommendations. They will also generate a writtenreport that will document the project conclusions and accompany anyensuing rulemaking efforts that may result from the generation ofthis data.

    C2.1 – Use Attainment

    Attainment/non-attainment of aquatic life uses will bedetermined by using biological criteria codified in OhioAdministrative Code (OAC) 3745-1-07, Table 7-17 (assessed withVolume II of the Biological Criteria for the Protection of AquaticLife,http://epa.ohio.gov/dsw/bioassess/BioCriteriaProtAqLife.aspx).Numerical biological criteria are based on multi-metric biologicalindices including the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) and modifiedIndex of Well-Being (MIwb), indices measuring the response of thefish community, and the Invertebrate Community Index (ICI), whichindicates the response of the macroinvertebrate community.Macroinvertebrate data collected from sites where only qualitativeprotocols are used to collect samples will be assessed with variousattributes of the macroinvertebrate community including, but notlimited to, total, EPT, and sensitive taxa diversity. A narrativeassessment of the data will be coupled with the fish assessment toconfirm or recommend an appropriate aquatic life use.

    Performance expectations for the basic aquatic life uses(Warmwater Habitat [WWH], Exceptional Warmwater Habitat [EWH], andModified Warmwater Habitat [MWH] were developed using the regionalreference site approach (Hughes et al. 1986; Omernik 1987). Thisfits the practical definition of biological integrity as thebiological performance of the natural habitats within a region(Karr and Dudley 1981). Attainment of an aquatic life use is FULLif all three indices (or those available) meet the applicablecriteria, PARTIAL if at least one of the indices did not attain andperformance did not fall below the fair category, and NON if allindices either fail to attain or any index indicates poor or verypoor performance.

    C2.2 – Stream Habitat Evaluation

    Complete and accurate stream habitat assessment data, along withthe survey’s biological findings, are essential to achieving thedata quality objectives identified in A7. All Ohio EPA field staffconduct annual habitat refresher training to ensure proper andconsistent habitat scoring.

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    C2.3 – Wetland Use Attainment, Antidegration Category andFloristic Quality

    Wetland tiered aquatic life use and antidegradation categorieswill be determined using vegetation criteria codified in the OhioAdministrative Code (OAC) 3745-1-54. Complete quantitativeassessment of wetland and/or riparian vegetation will be used toassign wetland antidegradation categories as identified in thequality objectives in A7. Non-wetland riparian vegetation will beassessed to evaluate vegetation floristic quality and vegetationdisturbance.

    SECTION D: DATA VALIDATION AND USABILITY

    D1 – Data Review, Verification, and Validation

    Data verification will be conducted by the study team withassistance from other DSW staff. The process will also result insummaries of any differences between initial sampling and methodsplanned in the QAPP and final results reported and available.Differences may result from samples not being collected (due toweather, scheduling, etc.) or other reasons. It is also possiblethat additional sampling would take place because of fieldobservations/conditions. Documenting deviations from the QAPP isthe responsibility of the project leader.

    All fish, macroinvertebrate, and habitat data are hand-enteredinto the EA3 database using a double data entry method. This helpsto minimize data entry errors. Final approval of data involves areconciliation between the paper forms and the electronic datawhich is completed by the data collector or a databaseadministrator in the Ecological Assessment Unit.

    Upon approval in EA3, field and laboratory data cannot berevised without intervention from database administrators in theAgency’s Office of Information Technology Services.

    D2 – Verification and Validation Methods

    Biological and habitat field sampling results will be verifiedand validated based on field staff experience and qualificationsand adherence to training and QA/QC procedures for current and newfield staff available in Subsection 1, Part A (macroinvertebrates)and Subsection 2, Part A (Fish and Habitat) in Biological Criteriafor the Protection of Aquatic Life: Volume III. StandardizedBiological Field Sampling and Laboratory Methods for Assessing Fishand Macroinvertebrate Communities (June 2015).

    The study team will make final decisions regarding validity andusability and will evaluate the sample collection, analysis, anddata reporting processes to determine if the data is of sufficientquality to meet the project objectives. Data validation involvesall procedures used to accept or reject data after collection andprior to use. These include screening, editing, verifying, andreviewing. Data validation procedures ensure that objectives fordata precision and bias will be met, that data will be generated inaccordance with the QAPP and SOPs, and that data are traceable anddefensible. The process is both qualitative and quantitative and isused to evaluate the project as a whole.

    D3 – Reconciliation with User Requirements

    Issues related to biological and habitat data uncertainty,including any patterns of field QC uncertainties, will be assessedby field staff and their management. For most situations, issuescan be addressed with acknowledgement of factors captured in thesample metadata which can confirm, explain, and document the dataquality concern. Significant, persistent, or unresolved issues willbe brought to the attention of the project study team, division QCpersonnel, and Ecological Assessment Unit and/or DSW management

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    for further evaluation. This combination of personnel willassess how to best label affected data for storage in the EA3database and how to eliminate or limit any similar problems goingforward. Consideration will also be given on how best tomemorialize data limitations or anomalies as the data istransferred to other databases, including the WQ Portal, so thatfuture users of the sampling data are aware of any data qualityissues or limitations.

    References Gara, B. The vegetation index of biotic integrity“floristic quality” (VIBI-FQ). Ohio EPA Technical Report

    WET/2013-2. Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, WetlandEcology Group, Division of Surface Water, Columbus, Ohio.

    Hughes, R.M., D.P. Larsen, and J.M. Omernik. 1986. Regionalreference sites: a method for assessing stream pollution. Env.Mgmt. 10(5): 629-635

    Karr, J.R. and D.R. Dudley. 1981. Ecological perspective onwater quality goals. Env. Mgmt. 5(1): 55-68.

    Mack, J.J. and B.D. Gara. 2015. Integrated wetland assessmentprogram. Part 9: Field manual for the vegetation index of bioticintegrity for wetlands v. 1.5. Ohio EPA Technical ReportWET/2015-2.Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Wetland Ecology Group, Div.of Surface Water, Columbus, Ohio.

    Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. 2015a. 2015 Updates toBiological criteria for the protection of aquatic life: Volume IIand Volume II Addendum. Users manual for biological fieldassessment of Ohio surface waters. Div. of Surface Water,Ecol.Assess. Sect., Columbus, Ohio. May 8, 2015.

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    2020_319_QAPP_FINALSection A – Project ManagementA1 – QualityAssurance Project Plan for CWA Section 319(h) Projects:Pre-Implementation Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2020 ProjectsProjects Sign-OffA2 – Table of ContentsA3 – Distribution ListA3.1 –Ohio EPA Central Office Staff

    A4 – Project/Task Organization and CommunicationA4.1 Roles andResponsibilities

    A5 – Problem Definition/BackgroundA6 – ProjectTask/DescriptionA6.1 – Project DescriptionsA7 – Quality Objectivesand CriteriaA8 – Special Training/CertificationA9 – Documents andRecordsA9.1 Document/Record ControlA9.2 Document Storage

    Section B – Data Generation and AcquisitionB1 – Sampling ProcessDesignB2 – Sampling MethodsB3 – Sample Handling and CustodyB4 –Analytical MethodsB5 – Quality ControlB6 – Instrument/EquipmentTesting, Inspection, and MaintenanceB7 - Instrument/EquipmentCalibration and FrequencyB8 – Inspection/Acceptance of Supplies andConsumablesB9 – Non-Direct MeasurementsB10 – Data ManagementB10.1 –EA3B10.2 - YSI® Pro Series UnitsB10.3- Fish, VIBI, and QHEI DataSheets

    Section C – Assessment and OversightC1 – Assessments andResponse ActionsC1.1 – AssessmentsC1.2 - Response ActionsC1.3 -Reporting and Resolution of IssuesC1.4 - Data Completeness

    C2 – Reports to ManagementC2.1 – Use AttainmentC2.2 – StreamHabitat EvaluationC2.3 – Wetland Use Attainment, AntidegrationCategory and Floristic Quality

    SECTION D: DATA VALIDATION AND USABILITYD1 – Data Review,Verification, and ValidationD2 – Verification and ValidationMethodsD3 – Reconciliation with User Requirements

    References

Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for Study Plan for ... Plan... · FY20 Section 319(h) Projects Study Plan July 2020 . 1 . Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for Study Plan - [PDF Document] (2024)

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